Moderate caffeine consumption may cause decreased growth of fetus: NIH study

29 March 2021 | News

The researchers noted that caffeine is believed to cause blood vessels in the uterus and placenta to constrict Image credit- shutterstock.com Image credit- shutterstock.com

Pregnant women who consumed the caffeine equivalent of as little as half a cup of coffee a day on average had slightly smaller babies than pregnant women who did not consume caffeinated beverages, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), US.

The researchers found corresponding reductions in size and lean body mass for infants whose mothers consumed below the 200 milligrams of caffeine per day(link is external) — about two cups of coffee — believed to increase risks to the fetus. Smaller birth size can place infants at higher risk of obesity, heart disease and diabetes later in life.

The researchers were led by Katherine L. Grantz, M.D., M.S., of the Division of Intramural Population Health Research at NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

The researchers noted that caffeine is believed to cause blood vessels in the uterus and placenta to constrict, which could reduce the blood supply to the fetus and inhibit growth.

Similarly, researchers believe caffeine could potentially disrupt fetal stress hormones, putting infants at risk for rapid weight gain after birth and for later life obesity, heart disease and diabetes.

The authors concluded that their findings suggest that even moderate caffeine consumption may be associated with decreased growth of the fetus.

Comments

× Your session has been expired. Please click here to Sign-in or Sign-up
   New User? Create Account

© Copyright 2021. Nuffoods Spectrum. All Rights Reserved.
Website Design & Developed By : SCI Knowledge Interlinks