Eating vegetables does not protect against cardiovascular disease: Study

eating-vegetables-does-not-protect-against-cardiovascular-disease-study
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Previous positive studies may not have sufficiently corrected for confounding socio-economic and lifestyle factors, suggests new analysis

A sufficient intake of vegetables is important for maintaining a balanced diet and avoiding a wide range of diseases. But might a diet rich in vegetables also lower the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD)? Unfortunately, researchers from the Nuffield Department of Population Health at the University of Oxford, the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and the University of Bristol found no evidence for this.

That the consumption of vegetables might lower the risk of CVD might at first sight seem plausible, as their ingredients such as carotenoids and alpha-tocopherol have properties that could protect against CVD. But so far, the evidence from previous studies for an overall effect of vegetable consumption on CVD has been inconsistent.

Now, new results from a large-scale new study in Frontiers in Nutrition shows that a higher consumption of cooked or uncooked vegetables is unlikely to affect the risk of CVD. They also explain how confounding factors might have explained previous spurious, positive findings.

The researchers also suggest that future studies should further assess whether particular types of vegetables or their method of preparation might affect the risk of CVD.

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